21 June 2015

posted 19 Jun 2015, 18:43 by C S Paul
21 June 2015

Quotes to Inspire
by unknown

  • Things could be worse. Suppose your errors were counted and published every day, like those of a baseball player.
  • When you realize you've made a mistake, make amends immediately. It's easier to eat crow while it's still warm.
  • I never make stupid mistakes. Only very, very clever ones.
  • Mistakes are the usual bridge between inexperience and wisdom.
  • Never say, "oops." Always say, "Ah, interesting.
  • Admit your errors before someone else exaggerates them.
  • We've all heard that we have to learn from our mistakes, but I think it's more important to learn from successes. 
  • If you learn only from your mistakes, you are inclined to learn only errors. 
  • Seek to do good, and you will find that happiness will run after you. 
  • The true way to soften one's troubles is to solace those of others. 
  • Kindness is like sugar, It makes life taste a little sweeter. 
  • Unhappiness is in not knowing what we want and killing ourselves to get it.
  • That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do; not that the nature of the thing itself is changed, but that our power to do it is increased- Ralph W. Emerson
  • The truth of a thing is the feel of it, not the think of it- Stanley Kubrick
  • Life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable, but more useful than a life spent doing nothing. George Bernard Shaw

The Touchstone
- Author Unknown

When the great library of Alexandria burned, the story goes, one book was saved. But it was not a valuable book; and so a poor man, who could read a little, bought it for a few coppers.

The book wasn’t very interesting, but between its pages there was something very interesting indeed. It was a thin strip of vellum on which was written the secret of the “Touchstone”!

The touchstone was a small pebble that could turn any common metal into pure gold. The writing explained that it was lying among thousands and thousands of other pebbles that looked exactly like it. But the secret was this: The real stone would feel warm, while ordinary pebbles are cold.

So the man sold his few belongings, bought some simple supplies, camped on the seashore, and began testing pebbles.

He knew that if he picked up ordinary pebbles and threw them down again because they were cold, he might pick up the same pebble hundreds of times. So, when he felt one that was cold, he threw it into the sea. He spent a whole day doing this but none of them was the touchstone. Yet he went on and on this way. Pick up a pebble. Cold – throw it into the sea. Pick up another. Throw it into the sea.

The days stretched into weeks and the weeks into months. One day, however, about midafternoon, he picked up a pebble and it was warm. He threw it into the sea before he realized what he had done. He had formed such a strong habit of throwing each pebble into the sea that when the one he wanted came along, he still threw it away.

So it is with opportunity. Unless we are vigilant, it’s asy to fail to recognize  an opportunity when it is in hand and it’s just as easy to throw it away.


Get Up
- Craig B. Larson

Bringing a giraffe into the world is a tall order. A baby giraffe falls 10 feet from its mother’s womb and usually lands on its back. Within seconds it rolls over and tucks its legs under its body. From this position it considers the world for the first time and shakes off the last vestiges of the birthing fluid from its eyes and ears. Then the mother giraffe rudely introduces its offspring to the reality of life.

In his book, “A View from the Zoo”, Gary Richmond describes how a newborn giraffe learns its first lesson.

The mother giraffe lowers her head long enough to take a quick look. Then she positions herself directly over her calf. She waits for about a minute, and then she does the most unreasonable thing. She swings her long, pendulous leg outward and kicks her baby, so that it is sent sprawling head over heels.

When it doesn’t get up, the violent process is repeated over and over again. The struggle to rise is momentous. As the baby calf grows tired, the mother kicks it again to stimulate its efforts. Finally, the calf stands for the first time on its wobbly legs.

Then the mother giraffe does the most remarkable thing. She kicks it off its feet again. Why? She wants it to remember how it got up. In the wild, baby giraffes must be able to get up as quickly as possible to stay with the herd, where there is safety. Lions, hyenas, leopards, and wild hunting dogs all enjoy young giraffes, and they’d get it too, if the mother didn’t teach her calf to get up quickly and get with it.

The late Irving Stone understood this. He spent a lifetime studying greatness, writing novelized biographies of such men as Michelangelo, Vincent van Gogh, Sigmund Freud, and Charles Darwin.

Stone was once asked if he had found a thread that runs through the lives of all these exceptional people. He said, “I write about people who sometime in their life have a vision or dream of something that should be accomplished and they go to work.

“They are beaten over the head, knocked down, vilified, and for years they get nowhere. But every time they’re knocked down they stand up. You cannot destroy these people. And at the end of their lives they’ve accomplished some modest part of what they set out to do.”

Mount Everest
- Brian Cavanaugh

Sir Edmund Hillary was the first man to climb Mount Everest. On May 29, 1953 he scaled the highest mountain then known to man-29,000 feet straight up. He was knighted for his efforts.

He even made American Express card commercials because of it! However, until we read his book, High Adventure, we don’t understand that Hillary had to grow into this success.

You see, in 1952 he attempted to climb Mount Everest, but failed. A few weeks later a group in England asked him to address its members.

Hillary walked on stage to a thunderous applause. The audience was recognizing an attempt at greatness, but Edmund Hillary saw himself as a failure. He moved away from the microphone and walked to the edge of the platform.

He made a fist and pointed at a picture of the mountain. He said in a loud voice, “Mount Everest, you beat me the first time, but I’ll beat you the next time because you’ve grown all you are going to grow… but I’m still growing!”


The Rock
- Brian Cavanaugh

An old farmer had plowed around a large rock in one of his fields for years. He 
had broken several plowshares and a cultivator on it and had grown rather 
morbid about the rock.

After breaking another plowshare one day, and remembering all the trouble the 
rock had caused him through the years, he finally decided to do something about 
it.

When he put the crowbar under the rock, he was surprised to discover that it 
was only about six inches thick and that he could break it up easily with a 
sledgehammer. As he was carting the pieces away he had to smile, remembering 
all the trouble that the rock had caused him over the years and how easy it 
would have been to get rid of it sooner.



Did You Know ?
  • A dog can hear high frequency sounds, which a human ear cannot. 
  • A donkey will sink in quicksand but a mule will not.  
  • A dragonfly can fly 25 mph. 
  • A dragonfly has a life span of 24 hours.  
  • A dragonfly is also known as "devil's darning needle", "horse stinger" and "devil's steelyard". 
  • A Fag is to work hard or to tire by strenuous activity and cigarettes are sometimes called Fags  
  • A fagot is a bundle of sticks or a bundle of pieces of wrought iron to be shaped by rolling or hammering at high temperature. 
  • A father Emperor penguin withstands the Antarctic cold for 60 days or more to protect his eggs, which he keeps on his feet, covered with a feathered flap. During this entire time he doesn't eat a thing. Most father penguins lose about 25 pounds while they wait for their babies to hatch. Afterward, they feed the chicks a special liquid from their throats. When the mother penguins return to care for the young, the fathers go to sea to eat and rest. 
  • A father sea catfish keeps the eggs of his young in his mouth until they are ready to hatch. He will not eat until his young are born, which may take several weeks.
  • A normal cow's stomach has four compartments: the rumen, the recticulum (storage area), the omasum (where water is absorbed), and the abomasum ( the only compartment with digestive juices). 
  • A notch in a tree will remain the same distance from the ground as the tree grows.  
  • A panagram is a sentence that contains all 26 letters of the English alphabet. For example: Pack my red box with five dozen quality jugs. 
  • A peanut is not a nut or a pea, it's a legume. 

Just for Laughs  

The Barber
Unknown 

There was a barber that thought that he should share his faith with his customers more than he had been doing lately. So the next morning when the sun came up and the barber got up out of bed he said, "Today I am going to witness to the first man that walks through my door." 

Soon after he opened his shop the first man came in and said, "I want a shave!" The barber said, "Sure, just sit in the seat and I'll be with you in a moment." The barber went in the back and prayed a quick desperate prayer saying, "God, the first customer came in and I'm going to witness to him. So give me the wisdom to know just the right thing to say to him. Amen." 

Then quickly the barber came out with his razor knife in one hand and a Bible in the other while saying "Good morning sir. I have a question for you... Are you ready to die?" 


Parking Place
Unknown


A minister parked his car in a no-parking zone in a large city because he was short of time and couldn't find a space with a meter. So he put a note under the wind shield wiper that read: "I have circled the block 100 times. If I don't park here, I'll miss my appointment. FORGIVE US OUR TRESPASSES." 

When he returned, he found a citation from a police officer along with this note. "I've circled this block for 10 years. If I don't give you a ticket, I'll lose my job. LEAD US NOT INTO TEMPTATION." 

Comments